Triumph TR4

Year1962
Body Style2 Door Roadster
Engine2138cc
ConfigurationRHD
Mileage42000
LocationUK
Price£12,000

The History

This particular TR4 has recently been rediscovered after spending the last 15 years of its life in storage, the previous owner drove it into a garage and forgot about it. The car has been given a good clean up and check over. it is pretty much complete and a runner although it does need some TLC. This is the perfect project car as everything is in place and working.

The car can be purchased as is or purchased with a view to us carrying out the restoration work on it for you. We have compiled a list of essential work to ensure safe road use which can be viewed at request.

The Triumph TR4 is a sports car produced by the Triumph Motor Company from 1961 to 1965. The car was based on the chassis and drivetrain of the previous TR sports cars, but with a modern body designed by Michelotti.

The TR4 body style did away with the cutaway door design of the previous TRs to allow for wind-down windows in place of less convenient side-curtains. The angular rear allowed a boot (trunk) with considerable capacity for a sports car.

On the TR4 has an easily folded and stowed vinyl insert and supporting frame called a “Surrey top”.

The pushrod Standard inline-four engine, was designed for use by the Ferguson TE20 tractor. The TR4 engine was continued from the earlier TR2/3 models, but the displacement was increased from 1991cc to 2138 cc in the TR4 by increasing bore size. Gradual improvements in the manifolds and cylinder head allowed for some improvements culminating in the TR4A model. The standard engine produced 105 bhp (78 kW) SAE but, supercharged and otherwise performance-tuned, a 2.2-litre I4 version could produce in excess of 200 bhp (150 kW) at the flywheel. The TR4, in common with its predecessors, was fitted with a wet-sleeve engine, so that for competition use the engine’s cubic capacity could be changed by swapping the cylinder liners and pistons, allowing a competitor to race under different capacity rules (i.e. below or above 2 litres for example).

Other key improvements over the TR3 included a wider track front and rear, slightly larger standard engine displacement, full synchromesh on all forward gears, and rack and pinion steering. In addition, the optional Laycock de Normanville electrically operated overdrive could now be selected for second and third gears as well as fourth, effectively providing the TR4 with a seven-speed manual close ratio gearbox.